"There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things."

~ Niccolo Machiavelli, historian and writer

Monday, October 10, 2016

The Disability Support Puzzle Changes Again

Some of you might recall me posting a little over two years ago when the Dept of Community Services first posted the Disability Supports Services for Persons with Disabilities (SPD) Program Policy online. The document covered both financial eligibility for the programs under the SPD umbrella and the Basic and Special Needs Policy. So good stuff, that.

Or, at least I thought so, until I noticed the other day that we now also have a Level of Support Policy, dated May, 2014, which appears to supplement the 2012 Policy. Which, yes, means I am a little out of date, but, really, if you knew about it, why didn't someone tell me? Personally, I find that it can be awful hard to keep with life these days.

But back to the point and that is this - this Levels of Support Policy appears to be significantly different than the 2012 Policy.

While the Disability Supports Program Policy (2012) mostly concerned itself with general eligibility requirements and SPD DSP support options (aka Places to Live), such as

  • Direct Family Support;
  • Independent Living;
  • Alternative Family Support;
  • Residential Care Facilities;
  • Group Homes;
  • Developmental Residences;
  • Small Options Homes;
  • Adult Residential Centres and
  • Regional Rehabilitation Centres

the new Levels of Support Policy focuses much more on "support planning" and the five "levels of support", along with the requirements for each.

If you're not "in the know", when an individual transitions to the adult system they are re-assessed and given a Levels of Support rating, from One to Five.The Support Levels look something like this:

  • Level One - Minimum Support
  • Level two - Moderate Support
  • Level three - High Support
  • Level four - Enriched Support; and
  • Level five - Intensive Support


What form of residential support "program support options" are available to that person will depend on what Level of Support they have been assessed as requiring.*

To come up with said Support Level, the assessment looks at
  • Activities of Daily Living;
  • Instrumental Activities of Daily Living;
  • Health Status;
  • Medical Conditions;
  • Behaviour; and
  • Safety

The Levels of Support Policy also deals with other issues, of course, such as
  • medical care and behavioral support requirements; 
  • acute nursing services; 
  • chronic medical conditions; 
  • end of life care; 
  • behavioral support parameters; and 
  • something called "discretionary case management regarding a program option". 

Of course, last, but certainly not least (and never to be forgotten) sits the the appeal process.

Intrigued? Perhaps you best check it out for yourself.


* You might want to consider asking for a copy of the Assessment after it's complete. You will likely be denied, but that's no biggie - just make an application under the Freedom of Information Act. Don't ask me why they make us jump through the hoops, but they usually do. At any rate, I think it's worth having a copy of this (and further reassessments if the Support Level is changed) just in case. Here, this might help.

** For a complete list (with links) of all policy documents under the Disability Supports Program, go here.

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